18 January - 22 February 2020

Continuation

Tom Kraanen, Maria Vashchuk

"Continuation" a new double solo exhibition with the works of Tom Kraanen and Maria Vashchuk.

 

Maria Vashchuk, born in 1985 in Kiev, the Soviet Union, in the family of modeler of men’s clothes and accountant. Spend the childhood in the Soviet House of Models of Kiev and different ateliers where my father worked. As an only child in the family had space for my own world of imagination. From craftsmanship focused on the texture of fabrics, styles of clothing, the interest in design has developed. On the other hand, drawing was used in designing and, above all, the basis for the painting. Psychology study was more than a 'rite de passage.' The study itself, university teaching, a Ph.D. research lead to a psychology practice that was transposed for some time as an online advisor after moving from Kiev to the Netherlands. In a teaching position and outside of it, communication and connection, organizing of joint activities were recurring elements. It seems that psychology as a profession has already faded into the background, and art has been brought to the fore as autonomous and applied. Connection and communication may have a chance in curatorship and the forms of teaching. The emphasis mainly illuminates the work in the studio with an as yet modest presence in the Art World — a fairly rapid international

network (Australia, United States, Canada) for the designs.

 

Tom Kraanen (b. 1990) is an autodidactic visual artist focussing primarily on painting. Having started off painting surrealistic portraits using shadows, his portraits became more and more realistic over time.

Finding human faces too definitive and restrictive, he now researches the visual language of abstract composition, texture and shapes.

In his current work Kraanen visualises the associative, non-linear way we process and interpret visual information. Painting as intuitive and autonomously as possible, the results are pleasantly disharmonious works that connect the viewer to something they might know is happening subconsciously, but rarely get to see.